Category Archives: Beef

Beef Barbacoa

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If you’ve had traditional barbacoa, this is not that.  Traditional barbacoa is cooked in leaf-covered pits.  I have neither a cooking pit (yet) nor access to leaves from [somewhat] far away lands.  The truth is, I’ve never even eaten traditional barbacoa.  All the same, here’s my version for those of us who remain pit-less.  We use a pressure cooker here.  However, it can also be braised on the stovetop in a Dutch oven.  A slow cooker may also be used.

While the recipe calls for a chuck roast, I’ve also used cuts such sirloin tip — or even bottom round if it’s on sale.   Or… how ’bout some venison barbacoa?  Whoa.

This can be served various ways:  Inside a burrito or taco.  On top of a warmed corn tortilla, tostada, or fresh tortilla chips (my preferred delivery system).  On a salad. On its own with a side of beans and rice.  Or mixed in with rice as a sort of quick, Latin biryani.  Gasp!!

Beef Barbacoa

Beef Barbacoa

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons cooking oil
  • 4 pounds beef chuck roast
  • 1 recipe Red Chile-Chipotle-Sauce (makes about 5 cups)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Sour Cream
  • Guacamole
  • Salsa
  • Lime wedges
  • Corn Tortillas

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in 12" skillet (or Dutch oven) over medium-high heat.
  2. Add roast and brown on all sides.
  3. If using a Dutch oven: Add 3 cups of Red Chile-Chipotle Sauce and bay leaf to beef to Dutch oven. Cover and simmer about 4 hours, until tender.
  4. If using a pressure cooker: Place beef in pressure cooker. Add 4 cups of Red Chile-Chipotle Sauce and bay leaf. Set to high pressure cook for 90 minutes, using a quick release.
  5. When the beef is finished cooking, transfer to a large bowl and shred using two forks. Mix in remaining Red Chile-Chipotle Sauce, to taste.
  6. Serve with sour cream, guacamole, lime, and warmed corn tortillas.
http://bleulegume.com/2016/05/beef-barbacoa/

 

Cabbage Rolls

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You probably can’t live in Southwestern Pennsylvania without having a recipe for cabbage rolls.  I’m not entirely certain, but it might be a requirement for citizenship.

This is my mom’s recipe for cabbage rolls. It makes enough to feed a small army – which happens to be the quantity in which she’d frequently cook. So, these would fit in well at a family reunion, graduation party, or other large gathering. If you don’t happen to have a large group to feed, the leftovers freeze very well. Just thaw and heat through in a 350 degree oven. Bam. Homemade cabbage rolls – [almost] whenever you want.

Cabbage Rolls

Yield: Makes about 34 cabbage rolls

Cabbage Rolls

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds lean ground beef
  • 3 pounds ground pork
  • 3 cups white (or brown) rice, cooked
  • 1/2 cup onion, grated (using large holes on a box grater)
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 large head of cabbage
  • 2 29-ounce cans whole tomatoes (in juice)
  • 1 29-ounce can tomato sauce
  • 1 pound sauerkraut

Instructions

  1. Discard the outermost leaves of the cabbage. Remove the core. Place the cabbage in a stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat.
  2. Turn the cabbage every couple minutes. Remove any leaves that are separating away from the head of cabbage and place them into a colander to drain and cool. Continue the process until all the leaves are cooked and pliable, about 10-15 minutes.
  3. Combine the beef, pork, rice, onion, allspice, salt, and black pepper. Mix well.
  4. Trim the thick center rib from the bottom of each cabbage leaf. Place meat mixture in the bottom of each leaf. Fold the sides of the leaf in and over the meat, then roll from bottom to top.
  5. Place rolls in a large baking tray. You can use a 20" x 12" full-size steam table tray, large roasting pan, or a couple 13" x 9" baking dishes.
  6. When the leaves get too small to stuff, simply chop them and toss them over top of the cabbage rolls. If there is any leftover meat mixture, make little oval-shaped meatballs to bake along with the cabbage rolls.
  7. Rough-chop the whole tomatoes and pour them (and the juice) into a mixing bowl along with the tomato sauce. Stir to combine. Pour evenly over the cabbage rolls.
  8. Scatter sauerkraut (and juice) over top of the sauce-covered cabbage rolls.
  9. Cover loosely with foil.
  10. Bake for 2 hours. Carefully, remove foil. Bake for another 30-60 minutes until the meat is cooked through and the cabbage is tender.
  11. Serve with mashed potatoes topped with the tomato sauce and sauerkraut remnants from the baked cabbage rolls. Yum!
http://bleulegume.com/2015/07/cabbage-rolls/

Beef Rouladen

 

 

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With a surplus of thinly sliced beef in the refrigerator, and a drawer full of kitchen twine at the ready, there really was no choice but to whip up a skillet full of beef rouladen.  While it’s not a quick dinner, it is both fairly easy and perfect for a Sunday dinner.  And, frankly, twine-wrapped meat never fails to impress guests.  As an added benefit, this recipe only uses 1/4 cup of red wine — leaving the remainder of the bottle to be enjoyed by the cook … and any helpers.

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Beef and Guinness Pot Pie

 

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So, my son wanted Guinness stew for his 21st birthday.  Not knowing how exactly it differed from my normal beef stew recipe, we did some research.  As it turns out, Guinness stew is very similar to my beef stew — though quite a bit thicker … and flavored with Guinness.  Eventually, I stumbled upon an incredible recipe from Jamie Oliver who included cheese and a crust in his version. I quickly followed suit.  How could I not?  Cheese? Crust?  Yeah!

I did, however, use some variations in ingredients (porcini, for example) and technique.  This gal is a huge fan of porcini as they lend a good deal of umami to a dish.  Porcini mushrooms are something I frequently use to boost flavor and sometimes meaty texture to savory dishes.  If you’re not looking to add or alter texture to a dish, dried porcini can be ground into a powder and used to simply boost flavor without altering texture.

Continue reading Beef and Guinness Pot Pie